South Plains Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, Inc.

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Find a baby bird or baby mammal?  Click on Baby Birds 101, above or go to the "More" tab (top right and click on Cottontails 101 for advice on what you should know before calling us - and whether you should intervene - or not.

     "Baby Season" is in full swing. Many young animals run into trouble because of predators, foul weather,  lawnmowers, tree pruners, weed-eaters, dogs, roaming cats AND well-meaning people.    


SPWRC needs volunteers every day of the year! Click on the Volunteer Opportunities tab above  for more information.  Call Gail Barnes at 806 799-2142. Help us help them!

     Founder Carol Lee finally created a Facebook account in mid-June. The day before, she signed SPWRC up on the GoFundMe website at GoFundme.com so it could be piggy-backed onto my new Facebook account. I hope we’ll get some donations from this site to help us reach our goal to modify our 26 year old three-story barn which has never been completed. For 19 years we were 100% volunteer, but when we had to hire a full and part-time employee, I saw that dream receding into the distant future. Last year, however, we received $189,435.00 from the Talkington Foundation, and this is seed money to jump start this project and makes it become a reality. A “good faith estimate” by our architect and builder estimates the cost at $295,621.00. We’d like to raise the difference - $106,186.00 – so we don’t have to strip our savings. Every penny not used for operating expenses has been put in the bank and we have no debt. Please check it out. If we’ve helped you in the past, perhaps you will help us reach our goal now! 

The photo above is the current, tired barn.

Mississippi Kite chick

  It was featured on our weekly "Wildlife Friday" segment recently n KLBK-TV, our local CBS affiliate. 


   It airs every Friday right after the weather forecast, and our goal is to help educate the public about all the wonderful species we share our space with - and what to do about conflicts people sometimes experience with wildlife.

Barn Owls in our flight cage.

 They will soon be released!

Volunteer Gail Barnes took this photo of our baby skunks

Baby Nine-Banded Armadillos

growing up at SPWRC!

(Photo by volunteer Danny Hancock)


They were brought in from Dickens, Texas, after their mother was killed by a car.

They are growing and thriving and will be released when they're ready for complete independence.

Baby Virginia Opossums


     The Virginia Opossum has the shortest gestation period of any mammal at only 11 –13 days. The pink, embryonic-looking infants are so small at birth that about 10 or more can fit into a teaspoon. 

     The infants continue to develop inside the pouch. and  remain in the pouch for about 2 1/2 months. At around 55-70 days the eyes open.

      As  youngsters grow and the pouch becomes full, the juveniles then ride on the mother's back until they're old enough to go out on their own. At this time they are also learning survival skills like finding food and predator avoidance.   If one of the young becomes separated from its mother it makes sneezing sounds to call her. She, in turn, makes clicking sounds.     The young are weaned at approximately 3 months of age and are on their own at 4 ½ - 5 months, when they’re approximately 7-9 inches long from nose to rump, excluding the tail.      In a few months they’ll reproduce and continue the fascinating life cycle of the Virginia opossum.

Did you find a baby bird 

or  baby mammal?

READ BABY BIRDS 101 ON THIS SITE

CLICK ON "MORE" ON THE TOP RIGHT TOOLBAR AND SCROLL DOWN TO COTTONTAILS 101. THOSE ARE GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR OTHER BABY MAMMALS, TOO.

  Check out our upcoming   events!


SPECIAL EVENTS AND DATES WILL BE POSTED HERE!  OUR NEXT OPEN HOUSE: TO BE ANNOUNCED - LIKELY IN LATE FALL OR AROUND HOLIDAYS WHEN OUR BARN PROJECT AND WATERFOWL FACILITY ARE COMPLETE OR NEARLY SO